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Publication Title | Weaving knowledge systems in IPBES, CBD and beyond lessons learned for sustainability

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Available online at www.sciencedirect.com ScienceDirect
Weaving knowledge systems in IPBES, CBD and beyond—lessons learned for sustainability
Maria Tengo ̈ 1, Rosemary Hill2, Pernilla Malmer1,
Christopher M Raymond3, Marja Spierenburg4, Finn Danielsen5, Thomas Elmqvist1 and Carl Folke1,6
Indigenous peoples and local communities live in, manage and own vast areas often rich in biodiversity and critical for ecosystem services. Bridging indigenous and local knowledge systems with scientific knowledge systems is vital to enhance knowledge, practice, and ethics to move towards sustainability at multiple scales. We focus on international science-policy processes and present a framework for evidence-based guidance on how tasks to mobilise, translate, negotiate, synthesise and apply multiple forms of evidence can bridge knowledge systems. Effective engagement of actors, institutions and knowledge-sharing processes is crucial in each of these tasks. We use examples from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to illustrate and discuss our framework.
Addresses
1 Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, S-106
91 Stockholm, Sweden
2 CSIRO Land and Water and James Cook University Division of Tropical Environments and Societies, PO Box 12139, Earlville BC, Cairns 4870, Australia
3 Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 58, S-230
53 Alnarp, Sweden
4 Department of Anthropology and Development Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
5 NORDECO, Skindergade 23, 3rd floor, DK-1159 Copenhagen K, Denmark
6 Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 50005, S-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden
Corresponding author:
The role for indigenous and local knowledge
systems in governance for sustainability
Governance of ecosystems is an enormous challenge in
the Anthropocene, characterized by complex interac-
tions and feedbacks of human action and global envi-
ronmental change [1,2]. Transdisciplinary processes are
needed to craft knowledge that is legitimate, credible,
and salient, as well as usable for moving towards sus-
tainability [3,4]. Indigenous and local knowledge sys-
tems,7 and the holders of such knowledge, carry insights
that are complementary to science, in terms of scope and
content, and also in ways of knowing and governing
social-ecological systems during turbulent times and
articulating alternative ways forward [5,6,7]. For
example, fisher-farmers in the Amazon delta navigate
both gradual and less predictable tidal regime changes
and build resilience through generating, innovating, and
integrating knowledge of a range of forest, agroforestry,
and fishing production systems [8]. Engagement of
indigenous peoples and local communities is vital for
these knowledge contributions, also as they live in,
manage and own vast areas of land often rich in biodi-
versity and of significance for the generation of critical

Science-policy arenas and agreements such as the Inter- governmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) acknowledge the impor- tance of indigenous and local knowledge in their work and explicitly support a diversity of knowledge systems to inform international biodiversity assessments and decision-making [10]. In sustainability science, research on co-production of knowledge [11,12] has only recently recognized the need for tailoring approaches to meet the particular contexts of diverse knowledge systems [6,13,14]. Engaging with indigenous and local knowledge systems involves encounters of different world views, identities, practices, and ethics, in a context of asymme- tries of power and rights [6,15,16]. Tools and approaches that consistently enable engagement towards useable
7 Indigenous and local knowledge system: a cumulative body of knowledge, practice and belief, evolving and governed by adaptive processes and handed down and across (through) generations by cultural transmission, about the relationship of living beings (including humans) with one another and with their environment (see Refs. [10,49,50]).
ecosystem services [9 ].
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2017, 26–27:17–25 This review comes from a themed issue on Open issue, part II Edited by Eduardo S Brondizio, Rik Leemans and William D Solecki
Received 15 June 2016; Revised 23 November 2016; Accepted 10 December 2016
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cosust.2016.12.005
1877-3435/ã 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creative- commons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
www.sciencedirect.com
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 2017, 26:17–25

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